Measuring the heart’s blood flow behaviour in 3D

An artificial ventricle – imaged alone on the ultrasound scanner – was made with a circulation system to simulate blood flowing in a heart chamber.

Given that cardiovascular related diseases are the most probable cause of death globally, according to WHO, we believe that more information regarding blood behaviour can help the doctors make better diagnosis at an earlier stage. But how can you measure these properties inside the heart, behind the ribs, under the skin, without moving the patients from their bed?

By Morten Smedsrud Wigen, PhD Candidate, Department of Circulation and Medical Imaging and CIUS – Centre for Innovative Ultrasound Solutions.

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Innovations in ultrasound – CIUS Fall Conference Day 2017

Collage from CIUS fall conference 2017

Innovation was the main topic at the Fall Conference Day for the Centre for Innovative Ultrasound Solutions (CIUS). Invited guest speakers, industry partners and CIUS researchers presented the latest, and coming, technology and applications within ultrasound. CIUS industry partners Aurotech Ultrasound AS opened the conference with an overview over their…

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Automatic lung cancer staging using CT data

CT images with organ segmentation.

Blogger: David Bouget, Post Doc, Centre for Innovative Ultrasound Solutions (CIUS) For patients suffering from lung cancer, the diagnosis phase is crucial in order to select the best course of action and predict both outcome and survival expectancy. At the same time, the diagnosis is solely based on one CT…

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Can a sugar treat atherosclerosis?

Infographics showing cholesterol crystals and macrophage

Blogger: Siril S. Bakke, PhD/Post doc, Centre of Molecular Inflammation Research (CEMIR) Cardiovascular disease resulting from atherosclerosis is one of the most common causes of death worldwide. Our new study reveals molecular mechanisms behind how a cyclic sugar reduces inflammation on the surface of cholesterol crystals. Inflammation and the activation…

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CEMIR researcher appointed Young Associate Investigator by NCMM

Richard Kumaran Kandasamy

Associate professor Richard Kumaran Kandasamy at the Centre of Molecular Inflammation Research (CEMIR) has been appointed as a Young Associate Investigator by the Centre for Molecular Medicine Norway (NCMM). Centre for Molecular Medicine Norway (NCMM) is an international biomedical research centre, with the overall objective of translating basic medical research into…

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Blood flow secrets in small hearts

Ultrasound images of trtralogy of fallot.

Using a new ultrasound technique, we have been able to visualize and measure how efficiently blood flows through the heart chambers in young children with congenital heart disease. We studied 37 children aged two weeks to 10 years, and among the 26 children, which had congenital heart disease, we found less efficient hearts, meaning they use more energy than a normal heart.

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Reducing SONAR overheating

Graph showing admittance as a function of frequency.

Blogger: Marcus Wild, PhD-candidate, Centre for Innovative Ultrasound Solutions (CIUS) and the University College of Southeast Norway. Within the maritime industry, ships use SONAR (Sound Navigation and Ranging) systems in order to make maps of the seabed. The problem with SONARs, is that they have a tendency to overheat. Our…

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Breast cancer – and the pursuit of Super survivors

Vevsbiter fra brystkreftsvulster.

Bloger: Maria Ryssdal Kraby, PhD-Candidate, Department of Clinical and Molecular Medicine Breast cancer survival is high. However, many cancer survivors experience long-term side effects from treatment which impact their quality of life. For this reason, the Breast Cancer Subtypes Project studies a group of women we call Super survivors. They are…

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