Tag Archives: Movember

Fusion makes a difference – also in the prostate!

ansattebilde.may-britt.tessemailin falkmo hansenBloggers:  Ailin Falkmo Hansen (PhD candidate) and May-Britt Tessem (Research Scientist), MR Cancer group

 

Movember is around with a “trøndersk” spirit on Facebook, Instagram, and the city is filled with mustaches in different shapes and varieties. The goal is increased awareness of men’s health and prostate cancer – a disease we in the MR cancer group want to understand better.

vevsbit og MR

Prostate tissue samples are stored in liquid nitrogen prior to MR spectroscopy analyses (photo: Geir Mogen/NTNU)

How can cancer metabolism provide important information about prostate cancer?

Scientists around the world have shown that changes in metabolism are important characteristics of cancer. We have studied how metabolism is altered due to cancer and how metabolism is changed owing to cancer aggressiveness. Previously, we have found that the two molecules citrate and spermine may be markers for prostate cancer and also can reveal information about aggressiveness.

Prostate cancer is a heterogeneous type of cancer, and this is of importance for treatment and prognosis of patients. However, today there are no reliable methods for assessment of type of prostate cancer. Researchers world-wide are therefore searching for new methods that may provide diagnostic and/or prognostic information. Presence of the fusion gene TMPRSS2-ERG have been suggested to be a candidate method for risk stratification, and in a recently published study we investigated the link between prostate cancer metabolism and TMPRSS2-ERG.

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Furry and fit: get moving this Movember!

Debbie Hill og Leslie WoodBloggers: Researcher Debbie Hill og PhD Candidate Leslie Euceda Wood
MR Cancer group, Department for ciruclation and medical imaging

 

 

 

It’s that time of year again! And this year, the Movember Foundation is challenging YOU to move every day this month to tackle physical inactivity. In keeping with the Movember spirit, the MR Cancer group (and friends!) donned their best training gear, and ventured out into the crisp breeze of a lovely November morning. Not only to raise a few smiles, but also to raise awareness for men’s health and prostate cancer.

MR Cancer-gruppen i treningstøy og barter.

According to the Movember Foundation a lack of physical activity is the fourth leading risk factor for global mortality, causing 3.2 million deaths worldwide per year. There is a push to combat physical inactivity by:

  1. Getting people moving (check out the MOVE campaign)
  2. Raising awareness on the dangers of physical inactivity & benefits of activity for both physical and mental health
  3. Finding new ways to encourage physical activity
  4. Investing in projects that increase understanding of what motivates men to move. Continue reading

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To treat or not to treat? The role of PET/MRI in prostate cancer

Mattijs ElschotBlog by: Mattijs Elschot
Postdoctoral Fellow at MR Cancer Group

Some prostate cancer patients need radical surgery to survive, whereas others can do without any form of treatment. The urologist determines to which group a patient belongs. Researchers at NTNU/St. Olavs Hospital investigate whether a PET/MRI scan can help making the correct decision.

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Early markers of a potentially dangerous type of prostate cancer

Morten Beck RyeBloggers: May-Britt Tessemansattebilde.may-britt.tessem and Morten Beck Rye

As we speak there are no accurate methods to diagnose potentially dangerous prostate cancer in an early stage of cancer.

From a pathologist’s point of view, aggressive cancers look totally similar to harmless subtypes in the beginning of development. As a consequence, the patients will be at high risk of overtreatment in the majority of cases where prostate cancer is detected. We urgently need new tools and markers to sort out the potentially dangerous types of prostate cancer from the non-dangerous in early disease. Most importantly, this will save the patients from reduced quality of life due to unnecessary surgical interventions, and also be economically beneficial for society.

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Your moustache makes a difference

Blogger: Siver Moestue532136_10151252982417512_69966992_n

 

 

 

 

During last years “Movember” – an annual month-long event involving the growing of moustaches during the month of November to raise awareness of prostate cancer – the Movember Foundation and associated charities raised 839 million NOK worldwide.

As a result, the Norwegian Cancer Society (Movember’s collaborator in Norway) distributed NOK 3.6 mill to research on prostate cancer in Norway. One of the two projects receiving support is a project led by Prof. Tone Frost Bathen (MR Cancer Group, ISB) and Prof. Anders Angelsen (Dept. of Surgery, St. Olavs Hospital and NTNU). The project is entitled “PET/MR imaging for improved diagnosis and personalized treatment in prostate cancer”.

.. we are highly grateful for the support from the Movember Foundation and all those who contribute by growing a moustache or make a donation to somebody who did.

This funding (NOK 1.2 mill) will be used to conduct a clinical trial in patients with suspected recurrence after prostate cancer surgery. This is a MO13-Download-Styleguide-I-patient group where rapid and accurate diagnostic procedures are needed to improve the outcome of the disease.

In collaboration with the Dept. of Radiology at St. Olavs Hospital, we will compare the diagnostic performance of PET/MR imaging with that of the current diagnostic procedures (CT + bone scintigraphy). A novel radiotracer, 18FACBC, will be used as its pharmacokinetic profile is suitable for imaging of the pelvic area.

Using PET/MR as a “one-stop-shop” can potentially simplify patient logistics, thereby shortening the time needed for re-staging the disease.

In addition, this tracer can also detect skeletal metastases, and we can therefore compare the sensitivity of PET/MR imaging to that of bone scintigraphy. Our hypothesis is that PET/MR imaging both can provide more accurate clinical information and reduce the number of different examinations the patients need to go through. Using PET/MR as a “one-stop-shop” can potentially simplify patient logistics, thereby shortening the time needed for re-staging the disease.

The project team believes that the multidisciplinary approach and the use of new technology will contribute to improved health services for prostate cancer patients, and we are highly grateful for the support from the Movember Foundation and all those who contribute by growing a moustache or make a donation to somebody who did. For more information on the study, contact Prof. Tone F. Bathen or Prof.  Anders Angelsen.

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